The answer, most likely, is yes.

Why? Well, to put it simply, gamification is everywhere.Gamification, the practice of adding game-like elements to non-gaming environments, improves engagement and boosts performance. It can be competitive, like a contest between salespeople. It can also be collaborative—think, a group of software developers working together during a hackathon. And that’s only the beginning.

The science behind it

Why gamification works. Or rather, wins.

Gamification lights up our brains. But don’t take our word for it. Our brains are wired to crave the chemicals that are released when we achieve different things. The rewards we get flood our senses with feel-good chemicals that boost our mood and motivate us to come back for more.

The Gamification Brain

Serotonin

This mood-regulating chemical, released when you feel wanted, important or proud, is triggered by achievements like badges, points and tokens.

Endorphins

Chemicals that relieve stress and pain, and boost your mood, endorphins are released when you work hard to complete a project.

Dopamine

The brain’s “happy” chemical, dopamine, is released in anticipation of receiving a reward and keeps us motivated to work hard.

Oxytocin

Our trust and love hormone, Oxytocin is released when we connect with others (either in-person or online) during a shared task.

The Gamification Brain

Serotonin

This mood-regulating chemical, released when you feel wanted, important or proud, is triggered by achievements like badges, points and tokens.

Endorphins

Chemicals that relieve stress and pain, and boost your mood, endorphins are released when you work hard to complete a project.

Dopamine

The brain’s “happy” chemical, dopamine, is released in anticipation of receiving a reward and keeps us motivated to work hard.

Oxytocin

Our trust and love hormone, Oxytocin is released when we connect with others (either in-person or online) during a shared task.

Extrinsic vs. intrinsic

Two types of motivation for sellers, level-up or cash out?

Intrinsic

Motivation that comes from within.

People feel compelled to buckle down and complete hard tasks because they truly enjoy it and feel pride. Think about top salespeople. They don’t need much of a push to work hard because they are intrinsically motivated.

Personal Growth

Personal Growth

Curiosity

Curiosity

Enjoyment

Enjoyment

Intrinsic

Motivation that comes from within.

People feel compelled to buckle down and complete hard tasks because they truly enjoy it and feel pride. Think about top salespeople. They don’t need much of a push to work hard because they are intrinsically motivated.

Extrinsic

Motivation driven by external factors.

Some people just want to earn rewards and badges or thrive on recognition. Think about your middle-performing salespeople. When they are close to achieving a quota or goal, they will put in the extra work.

Bonuses

Bonuses

Social Status

Social Status

Prizes

Prizes

Gamification Generation X, Y, Z

The games you played as a kid are likely to predict which gamification elements will get your attention—and keep you hooked—as an adult.

Often miscast as the niche pursuit of lonesome teenage boys, video games have been a cultural staple for at least three generations and counting.

In fact, four in five consumers have played a video game in the past six months—and it’s not just young people. More than 50 million people over 50 play video games frequently, up 25% from 2016, according to AARP.

Generation Y

Gen Z

(1996-2010)

Zoomers have grown up with personalized, on-demand, downloadable entertainment and open-world games that incorporate online social play. They’re likely to respond to community interaction, novel game formats and elements like personalized avatars.

Common uses of sales gamification.

Have you ever gotten lost in a game of Candy Crush? Pushed yourself harder to outpace a Peloton rival? If so, you’ve been played—by gamification.

From fitness apps and zoom filters to sales calls and social feeds, gamification has permeated many aspects of our daily lives. The practice of adding game-like elements to non-gaming environments improves engagement and performance.

Gamification can be competitive — like a contest for salespeople. It can also be collaborative, like a group of software developers working together during a hackathon.

Working Person

How gamification takes control at work.

Similar to playing a video game, there are different factors of gamification that help you control and push our team’s productivity.

Controller

Autonomy

Being in control feels good.

Mastery

The better you get at a game, the more you will attempt to level up your expertise.

Unpredictability

Not knowing what’s next keeps you engaged.

Scarcity

You want what you can’t have. That includes points or badges in a game.

Accomplishment

Progress makes people feel happy, especially when they overcome a challenge to achieve the reward, trophy, or leaderboard position.

Social Influence

From bragging rights to fitting in to making people jealous, carrying clout over others is a powerful force.

Positive Reinforcement

As people earn incentives and reap rewards, they enjoy the feeling and attempt to earn more.

Empowerment

Success in a game shows people that their efforts to figure things out are working, giving them a sense of authority.

The temples of gamification.

There is a reason that gamification is so popular in the workplace — it works. Click the doors to read some popular benefits:

Door

Improved Productivity

It’s no surprise that gamification boosts individual performance. In fact, 89% of employees say gamification makes them feel more productive at work. Likewise, 76% of people in a gamified situation finish tasks faster. Games FTW!

Door

Social Cohesion

Maybe it goes without saying, but collaborative gamification brings people together, with 87%of employees saying gamification provides a deeper sense of belonging and purpose. 88% say it makes them feel happier at work. Go team!

Door

Buy In

While the odds are low that 100% of your workforce will be interested in a specific game, gamification actually improves buy-in by 83% and 72% of workers say it inspires them to try harder. On the flip side, non-gamified initiatives yield only 28% participation, leaving almost half of employees feeling “bored.” Games FTW!

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